Interpretation Of Isozyme Data

The best guide for interpreting isozyme banding patterns is to perform a thorough genetic analysis. Unfortunately, for many fungi this may be difficult or impossible. The purpose of this section is to provide enough information for accurate interpretation of isozyme banding patterns even without a genetic analysis. Accurate interpretation of isozyme banding patterns requires knowledge of the ploidy of the organism and the number of subunits required to form the active enzyme. Most enzymes should give a relatively simple banding pattern with only one to three bands per individual (Figure 1). Enzymes with relatively nonspecific stains (e.g., esterases)

Figure 2 Subunits with — 2 and — 3 charges combine at random to form an active dimeric enzyme. A, In this example, random combination of subunits yields three dimers with total charges of — 4, — 5, and — 6 in a ratio of 1:2:1. B, The pattern that results on a gel after electrophoresis and staining. Direction of migration is indicated by the arrow.

Figure 2 Subunits with — 2 and — 3 charges combine at random to form an active dimeric enzyme. A, In this example, random combination of subunits yields three dimers with total charges of — 4, — 5, and — 6 in a ratio of 1:2:1. B, The pattern that results on a gel after electrophoresis and staining. Direction of migration is indicated by the arrow.

often give complicated banding patterns that are difficult or impossible to interpret without a genetic analysis. Unless crosses can be made easily those systems are best avoided.

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