Fig 97 Fitting An Ax Handle By The Use Of A Wood Rasp

Remove the old handle from the ax as follows a) Place the ax in a metal vise, and with a hack saw, cut off the handle close to the ax. b) Remove as much of the old handle out of the eye as possible, by the use of iron drills held in a carpentry brace. The larger drills are preferable to the- smaller ones. Under no circumstances should the wood bits be used, as contact with the iron wedges and the metal of the ax will damage the cutting edges. c) After having removed as much of the old handle as...

Fig 107 Centerpunching The Heads Of The Rivets

Fig. 108. drilling off the heads of the old rivets fig. 108. drilling off the heads of the old rivets Another way is to make a pattern of heavy paper the shape of the ferrule, and by its use select a handle of the same shape. 2. Remove the old handle as follows (a) Place it in the vise or on an anvil, as shown in Figure 107, and center-punch the heads of the rivets. b) Drill off the heads of the old rivets by using a metal drill. The chain drill, as shown in Figure 108, is a suitable tool for...

Fig 70 Gumming A Crosscut

Harden the metal that the file will not cut it. This is indicated by the blue color which the blade assumes where the grinding is being done. The amount to grind from a gullet is partly determined by the particular saw at hand. Effort should be made to grind the gullets and file the teeth to their original shape and size. In doing this work, very little pressure should be placed on the side of the gummer, as it is a rather thin stone, and it will not stand as much pressure at the side as the...

And An Emery Grinder

Slowly turned backward one revolution. The motor is stopped, and the points of the teeth examined. If not all points have been touched, the bolt through the angle iron is given a turn, thus causing the 1 -in. member to slide on the lower member and the saw forced closer to the grinder. The truing process is thus continued until the shortest tooth is touched. Saws from 8 to 40 in. in diameter may be trued up with the jig. It may also be used to support the saw while gumming it. Circular saws...

Fig 47 Handsaw Clamp

Detail drawing D shows the way to make the lower end of the levers and locking device. It will be noted that there are two levers which are held with a cross brace at the bottom. At the lower end of each lever, a triangular block is fastened with screws. The upper ends of the levers are fastened to the front jaw of the clamp, as shown in the side view of the clamp, using two 1 2-in. screws and one by 2-in. flathead stove bolt in each lever. The screws are placed above the bolt. The head of the...

Fig 87 Setting A Circular Cordwood Saw With Hammer And Railroad Rail

A saw being set in this way is shown in Figure 87. The edge of the rail is sufficiently lower than the center to give each tooth a set as it is struck with a light hammer. Another good way to use a railroad rail as a homemade anvil set is shown in Figure 88. A suitable bevel is filed at the end of the rail at the bottom part. The saw points are brought to the edge of the rail over the beveled surface and struck with a ham-

Laying Out The Teeth Of A Handsaw

If some of the teeth of a handsaw have been broken off, the saw will have to be ground down to the base of the teeth and new teeth laid out. A very good way for a beginner to learn the shape of saw teeth and get a clear mental picture of what he is to make in shaping teeth by filing, is for him to lay out a few teeth on an old blade and file them. If he can lay out and file a few teeth on an old blade, it is reasonable assurance that he can file teeth of a saw. Until he is able to lay out and...

Fitting An Ice

There are different ways of filing ice saws. Two ways are shown in the following illustrations. Figure 93 shows the shape of the teeth as made by one well-known manufacturer, and Figure 94 that of another. The teeth in Figure 93 are very similar to those of the timber saw, while those in Figure 94 more closely resemble the teeth of a hand ripsaw. The first thing to do in fitting an ice saw is to joint it. This is done by running the side of a flat file lengthwise of the saw over the teeth. The...

Hinged Table For Gumming Saws

The table shown in Figure 79 has been used satisfactorily with the grinding stand and grinder shown in Figure 8, for gumming saws. The table top consists of two boards placed side by side and held together with 1 -in. cleats at the ends. The posts are made of Vs by 2-in. wood strips, long enough to bring the top of the table in line with the center of the grinder. If the dimensions of' the bench, grinder stand, and toolrests shown in Figure 6 are used, the posts will have to be 44 2 in. long....

Gasoline Engine And Countershaft

Engine Photos Where Use Countershaft

If a gasoline engine and grinder are mounted on the same bench, the vibration is so great as to make grinding very difficult, and it is, therefore, not recommended. The gasoline engine should be mounted on a concrete base separate from the grinder. It may-then be belted directly to the grinder, as shown in Figure 4. However, it is more satisfactory to use a countershaft, as shown in Figure 5. If it is belted directly to the engine, an 11- or 12-in. FIG. 6. ARRANGEMENT OF GRINDER, GASOLINE...

File And Worker For Filing

Of the teeth is controlled by the extent to which the file is tilted, or tipped sidewise, toward the point of the saw. If the file were so held as to have its top side horizontal, the front and the back of each tooth would have the same angle. There would not be enough hook to the front of the teeth to cause them to take hold well. Such a saw is spoken of as a peg-tooth saw. The crosscut handsaw is not filed straight across, as is the ripsaw. The file is held as shown at A and B, Figure 60, so...

Timbersaw Clamp

Success in filing a timber saw depends on two factors (1) the light, and (2) some clamping device which will hold the saw free from vibration while the work is being done. The saw clamp shown in Figure 64 is designed to be used independently of a metal-working vise, and may be taken where-ever the light is good for the work. It may be taken to the wood lot and used as needed, as well as in the farm shop. The framework of the clamp consists of two pieces of 2 by 4, each 48 in. long, a brace at...

Fig 68 Championtooth Timber

Champion tooth, which has two cutting teeth between each pair of rakers, is shown in Figure 68. To cut properly, a saw must meet the following requirements 1. All cutting teeth must be the same length, so that each tooth will do its share of the cutting. 2. Each cutting tooth must be filed to a point. 3. All rakers must be of a uniform length. 4. The rakers must be shorter than the cutting teeth by an amount suited to the kind of wood the saw is to cut. 5. The gullets, or spaces between teeth...

Fitting A Ripsaw

The shape of ripsaw teeth is shown in Figures 51, 52, and' 53. The front or cutting faces of the teeth are at right angles to a line along the points of the teeth. This may be tested with a square, as shown in Figure 53. A triangular file in the correct position between two teeth is shown at A. It will be noted that the side of the file which is against the front of a tooth is held plumb. By holding one side of the file plumb and by pressing the file down into the gullet, the back of the tooth...

Fig 55 Position Of Filer For Fitting A Ripsaw

The right hand holds the handle end of the file firmly, and the point of the file is held lightly between the thumb and index finger of the left hand, with the palm of the left hand up or toward the saw. Every other tooth is filed from one side of the saw then the saw is placed in the clamp end for end, and the rest of the teeth are filed from the other side of the saw in the same way. At each stroke, the file is to cut the back of the tooth that projects away from the filer and the front of...

Cleaning And Sharpening Auger Bits

An easy and effective way to clean auger bits is shown in Figure 42. A strand of rope is saturated with cylinder oil and then coated or covered with fine emery dust. The bit is held rigidly in a metal vise, and the rope is wound once or twice around the bit and drawn back and forth. The oil holds the emery dust on the rope, and the dust acts as an abrasive which cleans the rust from the metal. A good way to coat the rope with the emery dust and oil is to place a quantity of the emery dust in a...

Fig 32 Grinding A Disk From A Disk Harrow

And forth on the stone so as to remove all irregularities, to thin the blade as much as desired, and to bring the tool to a cutting edge It is very essential that the disk be moved back and forth, as holding it in one position would result in making it too thin. It is not recommended that a disk harrow be taken apart for grinding, but, if for any reason the disks are taken off, they may be ground in a manner similar to that used in grinding a disk colter. The disk may be held with the toolrest,...

Fig 74 Filing The Cutting Teeth Of A Timber

In the teeth, a rather blunt point is desirable. If the saw is to be used in soft wood, where strength of teeth is not so essential, a longer point may be filed. To obtain a long point, the handle end of the file is held low and to the right or left, depending on which side of the tooth is being filed. Full, light strokes of the file are most satisfactory for the work. Files cut on the forward stroke only, therefore the file is raised from the saw at each stroke. The point which is being filed...

Reshaping And Tempering A Screw Driver

Heat about 3 in. of the end of the screw driver to a cherry red. 2. Place it on the anvil, and hammer it on one side and one edge to the desired thickness and width. 3. Grind or file the end back to make it square or at right angles to the sides, as shown at B, Figure 137. 4. File the sides at the end to a shape as shown at D, with the sides parallel for about V in., and as thick as the width of