Fitting An Ice

There are different ways of filing ice saws. Two ways are shown in the following illustrations. Figure 93 shows the shape of the teeth as made by one well-known manufacturer, and Figure 94 that of another. The teeth in Figure 93 are very similar to those of the timber saw, while those in Figure 94 more closely resemble the teeth of a hand ripsaw.

The first thing to do in fitting an ice saw is to joint it. This is done by running the side of a flat file lengthwise of the saw over the teeth. The purpose of jointing the saw is to bring all points to a line so that all teeth will do an equal amount of work. Unless this is done, the teeth, which have become shorter due to

abuse or poor filing, will be back from where the cutting is to be done, and the saw will not cut as fast or as well as it should.

The teeth of the saw shown in Figure 93 are 1% in. long, and 11/2 in. between points. The fronts of the teeth are about 80 deg. to a line along the points of the teeth. This angle may be tested

Ripsaw Tooth Shape Handsaw Gallery

by the use of a steel square and T bevel. Set the T bevel at 1 in. on the tongue and 5*4 in. on the blade of the steel square, as shown in Figure 95.

Both the front and the back of each tooth is made straight across or at right angles to the sides up to within V2 in. of the point of the tooth.

In filing, only % in. of the tip is filed. The file is not allowed to run down on either the front or back of the tooth more than

The bevels at both the front and the back of a tooth are alike; that is, about 72 deg. This bevel, or angle, may also be obtained to run down on either the front or back of the tooth more than

The bevels at both the front and the back of a tooth are alike; that is, about 72 deg. This bevel, or angle, may also be obtained

FIG. 95. SETTING THE T BEVEL AT FIG. 06. SETTING THE T BEVEL AT 80 DEGREES BY THE USE OF 70 DEGREES BY THE USE OF

THE STEEL SQUARE THE STEEL SQUARE

FIG. 95. SETTING THE T BEVEL AT FIG. 06. SETTING THE T BEVEL AT 80 DEGREES BY THE USE OF 70 DEGREES BY THE USE OF

THE STEEL SQUARE THE STEEL SQUARE

. 2in. on the blade of the steel square, as shown in Figure 96.

Every other tooth is filed from one side and the rest from the . other side. The file is held against the tooth for filing both front and back at the angle shown by the T bevel in Figure 96.

The filing is continued until the flat surface, which has been caused on the tips of the teeth by jointing, has been filed away and a sharp point has been made. One must be sure to stop filing when a point has been made, as a stroke of the file after the point has been reached will bring the point of the tooth below the others and it cannot do its share of the cutting.

Each alternate tooth is set to one side and the others in the opposite direction, so as to make a saw kerf wider than the thickness of the saw blade, which is about Ys in. on a large saw. The set is short and abrupt. Only about % in. of the point of each tooth is set. Enough set is given the teeth to make a saw kerf about 3/16 in. wide. (See top view, Fig. 93.) The spring set, which is used in setting timber saws, or a hammer-and-anvil set, may be used.

Figure 94 shows another type of ice saw. The teeth on this one have quite a different shape from those shown in Figure 93. The teeth in Figure 94 resemble closely those of the hand ripsaw.

It will be noted in Figure 94 that the fronts of the teeth are at 82 deg. to a line along the points of the teeth. This angle may be tested with the T bevel set at % in. on the tongue and 5% in. on the blade of the steel square in the manner shown in Figures 95 and 96.

After the saw is jointed, both the fronts and the backs of teeth are filed straight across the blade, bringing the teeth to an edge, much like a wood chisel. Then a slight bevel is filed on the back of each tooth so that the points marked x in Figure 94 will be slightly above points marked y after the saw is set.

The angle at which this bevel is filed is about 82 deg., and the position for direction of file is shown by lines marked z in Figure 94.

The set on this saw is shorter, hence more abrupt, than the one in Figure 93. It should not be less than Yx in. nor more than 3/16 in. It may be made or done with the timber spring set or an anvil set, as suggested in Figure 85. A railroad rail also may be used, as shown in Figure 88.

V. Farm-Tool Handles

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