Points On Fitting Small Circular Saws

Two shapes of cut-off teeth are shown at A and B, Figure 92. The shape shown at A is called a "V pitch/' and the one at B a "center pitch." A line from the point of a V-pitch tooth to the center of the saw divides the tooth at the center. The front of a center-pitch tooth falls on a line from the point to the center of the saw.

There is no set rule governing the amount of bevel which is to be placed on the tooth of a saw. This varies according to the hardness of the wood to be cut. When cutting hard wood, do not carry the same amount of bevel as for cutting soft wood.

On the style of tooth shown at A, a bevel of approximately 20 deg. will be found suitable for cutting both hard and soft wood.

On the style of tooth shown at B, a bevel of 20 to 25 deg. at the front, and one of about 10 deg. at the back will do for both hard and soft wood.

For ripsawing, the shape of tooth shown at C is best suited for saws over 10 in. in diameter. For saws under 10 in. in diameter, the shape as at D is suitable. It will be noted that the fronts of the teeth shown at C fall on a line that is drawn tangent to a circle about halfway between the center of the saw and the rim. The gullets are rounded out and the backs of the teeth filed to an arc. The fronts of the teeth for the smaller saws, as shown at D, fall on a line drawn tangent to a circle that is less than half the distance from the center of the saw to the rim. The gullets are also rounded slightly, but the backs of the teeth are straight.

There is a slight bevel on both face and back of ripsaw teeth. The bevel on the back of the tooth is hardly noticeable, however; just sufficient to bring out the corner good and sharp.

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