Boltthreading Equipment And Its

A few threading tools will enable a farmer to make many handy appliances as well as to make certain repairs on farm machinery and equipment, such as rethreading bolts with battered threads, making bolts to

Fio. 204.—Threading toola. A. die; B, stock for holding dio; C, t*p wrcnch; D, tap.

Fxq. 205.—A «si of tap« and dies, known sus a ecrcw plate, is a valuable asset in the farm shop.

exactly the length needed, making truck and wagon-bed irons, long brace rods, etc.

Threads are cut on a rod or bolt by a small hardened steel tool called a die. The die proper, which is replaceable and usually adjustable, is held in a handle called a stock. The tool used for cutting threads inside

Fxq. 205.—A «si of tap« and dies, known sus a ecrcw plate, is a valuable asset in the farm shop.

a hole, as in a nut which screws on a bolt, is called a tap. A set of taps and dies is called a screw plate.

231. Kinds of Threads.—U.S.S. (United States Standard) threads are most commonly used on farm machinery and equipment. S.A.E. (Society of Automotive Engineers) threads are used on automobiles, tractors, engines, and other machines where extra-strong steel bolts are used. S.A.E. threads are similar to the U.S.S. threads but are finer, and there are more threads per inch. Nuts may be drawn up tighter on bolts with S.A.E. threads, and they will not shake loose so easily.

On small bolts and screws used in carburetors, magnetos, and similar small apparatus, machine screw threads are commonly used.

Pipe threads are used on pipes and on such parts as grease-cup connections and fuel- and oil-tube connections on engines and machinery. (See pages 172 to 181 for a more complete discussion of pipe threads and pipe-threading tools.)

232. Bolt-threading Equipment for the Farm Shop.—A set of taps and dies that will cut the five most common sizes of U.S.S. threads 04,

%, and Yl in.) will prove quite an asset in the farm shop. If it can be afforded, a set that will cut and %-in. .threads also would of course be better. A set that would cut both U.S.S. and S.A.E. threads up to and including the %-in. size would be ideal but would be rather expensive and hardly justified for most farm shops.

A split adjustable type of die is preferred by most mechanics. Such dies can be adjusted to cut threads slightly smaller or larger than standard.

A set of taps and dies for cutting machine-screw threads would seldom be needed on the farm, nor would a complete set of pipe-threading tools. Pipe tap3 and dies to cut the two smaller sizes, and yi in., might be useful for making repairs occasionally on oil and grease connections and brass-tube connections on machinery.

Fig. 206.—The number of threads i>er inch on a boit may be determined by measuring with a rule and counting, or by reading the markings on a tap or die that cuts the samo thread.

233. Determining Number of Threads per Inch.—To determine the number of threads per inch on a bolt, it may be held against a tap from

Fig. 206.—The number of threads i>er inch on a boit may be determined by measuring with a rule and counting, or by reading the markings on a tap or die that cuts the samo thread.

a set of taps and dies, to see if the threads on the bolt and tap correspond. If they do, then the number of threads per inch may be read from the markings on the tap. Likewise, dies from the set may be tried on the

Fio. 207.—To enable the dio to start easily, the end of a rod should be tapered slightly by filing, grinding, or hammering.

Fio. 207.—To enable the dio to start easily, the end of a rod should be tapered slightly by filing, grinding, or hammering.

bolt until one is found that fits perfectly, and the threads per inch and the size of bolt determined from the markings on the die. The number of threads per inch can also be determined by placing a rule against the threaded end and counting the threads for one inch.

234. Threading a Rod or Bolt—The end of a rod to be threaded should first be slightly tapered by filing, hammering, or grinding, so the die will start' on easily. Care should be exercised to start the die straight on the rod. Equal pressure should be exerted on the two handles of the stock. After the die is started it will feed itself onto the rod.

Lard oil or threading oil should be used on the die when cutting steel. It will make the die cut easier, cut a smoother thread, and the die will stay sharp and last much longer.

Dies should be turned around and around in the forward direction without backing up until the thread is finished. If chips and cuttings have a tendency to collect in the die and clog it, they should be punched out with a small nail, a wire, or a small piece of wood. If allowed to accumulate, they will cause rough or torn threads. When the thread is cut as far as desired, the die is simply screwed back off. Before putting the die away, the cuttings should be shaken from it and the excess oil wiped off.

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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