Veneering

Veneering is the art and craft of gluing a thin sheet of exotic or precious wood to a common wood groundwork. The object of the exercise is to fool the eye into believing that the workpiccc - say a table or screen - is made in its entirety from the precious wood. There are many reasons for veneering. For example, you can make a precious wood go further, create surface patterns and give the illusion that a piece of furniture is made from a particular wood, while in fact it would be structurally impossible to do so. For instance, it would be impossible to construct a piece of furniture from ebonv, simply because it would be too heavy. And then again, while burr walnut is a wonderfully attractive w<xk1, it is so brittle and unstable, that it would fall to bits when machined in the round. Traditionally, the veneering technique involves heating up hide glue, coating the groundwork and/or the sheet of veneer with the hot liquid glue, bringing the two together, smoothing the veneer with a special weighted hammer and then variously pressing and clamping the veneer in place - before finally scraping, sanding and finishing.

Not so long ago, veneering was viewed more or less as a technique that primarily had to do with concealing poor workmanship. The current desire by the various "green" movements to conserve rare wood, has resulted in a popular revival of interest in veneering. What better way of protecting an endangered species than by making a little go a long way? All that said, if you are interested in using exotic species, you want to save money, and you want to minimize your usage of rare w<x>d, then it logically follows that you need to learn about veneering techniques.

Suwiess steel rollers

Chamfered corners

A80VE: J-type veneer roller hk projection onfy on one ude

Heavy gauge ntckel-plated copper inner pot left: Thermostatically controlled glue pot that does not require water.

Suwiess steel rollers

A80VE: J-type veneer roller hk projection onfy on one ude

Rounded bra┬╗ stnp invet.

Chamfered corners above: Veneer hammer, used for pressing down veneers and squeezing out excess glue.

Heavy gauge ntckel-plated copper inner pot left: Thermostatically controlled glue pot that does not require water.

Veneering with PVA Adhesive

Veneering with PVA Adhesive

Though traditionally veneering was a craft that had to do with complex presses, hot glue, trickv sheets of veneer that were liable to crack and curl and all manner of unpredictable difficult-to-manage techniques, the current interest in the craft has resulted in some exciting quick-and-casy methods. For example, there are adhesives that stick on impact without heat and pressure, and there are cold glues that can be used straight from squeezv containers. There are also thermoplastic glue-films, that can be pressed in place with a domestic hot iron, and so on. And then again, many of I he difficulties that had to do with constructing a suitable substrate have been solved by the introduction of an incredibly stable man-made sheet material called medium-density fiberboard or simply MDF. And perhaps most interesting of all, there arc now super-thin flexible veneers that come in rolls that can be handled with relative case.

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