Agonopterix nervosa Haworth Carrot parsnip flatbody moth

Infestations of this generally common species occur on various umbelliferous plants including, occasionally, cultivated carrot and parsnip. Damage caused is of little or no importance.

BIOLOGY

Adults occur in August and then hibernate. They reappear in the following spring and deposit eggs on the leaves of host plants. Larvae feed on the flower heads in June and July, surrounded by silken webbing; they also bore into the stems and petioles. Pupation occurs in the pith of plant stems.

DESCRIPTION

Adult 21-24 mm wingspan; forewings mainly brown with slightly dusky veins; hindwings pale but darkened apically. Larva up to 20 mm long; body blue-black, marked with orange laterally and intersegmentally; pinacula distinct black and white-edged; head and prothoracic plate black. Pupa 10-12 mm long, brown and shiny.

Depressaria pastinacella (Duponchel) Parsnip moth

This moth is a widespread and often common, but minor, pest of cultivated parsnip. The larvae also feed on certain wild umbelliferous plants, including Heracleum sphondylium and Pastinaca sativa. The larvae, which damage the stalks and flower heads, weaken host plants and reduce crop yields and quality.

BIOLOGY

Larvae, often known as 'parsnip webworms', feed from June onwards. At first, they attack the aerial parts of host plants, including the flower heads and seed capsules, and produce tough strands of silk amongst which they shelter. Later, the larvae bore into the plant stems, usually towards the base of the leaves. Fully fed larvae pupate in the stalks of host plants. Adults appear in the autumn and then hibernate. They reappear in the following March or April, and eggs are then laid on the leaves of parsnip and other hosts.

DESCRIPTION

Adult 25-27 mm wingspan; thorax pale brown with three short black longitudinal lines anteriorly; forewings mainly pale brown, suffused with black and ochreous-white, and patterned with black streaks (Plate He); hindwings ochreous-white to greyish. Larva up to 25 mm long; body dark bluish-grey above and ochreous to brownish-yellow laterally and below; pinacula black, shiny and prominent; head and pro-thoracic plate black and shiny (Plate llf).

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