Effects of animal waste on the water resource

Animal waste contains a number of contaminants that can adversely affect surface and ground water. In addition, certain of the constituents in animal waste can impact grazing animals, harm terrestrial plants, and impair air quality. However, where animal waste is applied to agricultural land at acceptable rates, crops can receive adequate nutrients without the addition of commercial fertilizer. In addition, soil erosion can be substantially reduced and the water holding capacity of the soil can...

C Chemical reactions

Management for utilization of organic waste material must take into account the chemical reactions that occur between the soil and the waste components. These reactions are broadly grouped as ion exchange, adsorption, precipitation, and complexation. The mechanisms and rates of these reactions are dependent upon physical, chemical, and biological properties of the soil and organic waste material. Organic waste mineralization by-products consist of macro- and micro-plant nutrients, soluble...

A Field and forage crops

Manure and sewage have been used for centuries as fertilizers and soil amendments to produce food for human and animal consumption. Generally, manure and sludges are applied to crops that are most responsive to nitrogen inputs. Field crops that are responsive include corn, sorghum, cotton, tobacco, sugar beets, and cane. Sewage sludge should not be used on tobacco. The liming effect of the sludge can enhance the incidence of root diseases of tobacco. It can also elevate cadmium levels in...

A Landscape elements

Manipulation of landscape elements, such as structures, landform, water, and vegetation, can improve the operation of an existing AWMS or help to integrate a new AWMS into the farmstead. Each farm can be viewed as a series of spaces used for different operations linked together by roads or paths. The arrangement of structures, landform, water, and vegetation within this system affects aesthetic quality, operational efficiency, energy consumption, runoff, and specific functions on the site....

E Dryingdewatering

If the water is removed from freshly excreted manure, the volume to handle can be reduced. The process of removing water is referred to as dewatering. In the arid regions of the United States, most manure is dewatered (dried) by evaporation from sun and wind. Some nutrients may be lost in the drying process. Dried or dewatered manure solids are often sold as a soil conditioner or garden fertilizer. These solids may also be used as fertilizer on agricultural land. They are high in organic matter...

D Aesthetic quality

Aesthetic quality is acknowledged as an integral part of daily life and underlies economic and other decisions about the land (fig. 8-13). Many land management decisions, including those related to planning and design of an AWMS, are made because of a decisionmaker's perception of what will enhance aesthetic quality and reflect a stewardship ethic to neighbors. Highly visible AWMS components, such as storage tanks that are easily identified by their color, and associated conservation practices...

B Liquid and slurry waste storage

Liquid and slurry manure can be stored in waste storage ponds or in aboveground or below-ground tanks. Solids separation of manure and bedding is a problem that must be considered in planning and design. Solids generally can be resuspended with agitation before unloading, but this involves a cost in time, labor, and energy. Another option allows solids to accumulate if the bottom is occasionally cleaned. This requires a paved working surface for equipment. Earthen storage is frequently the...

Direction and hydraulic gradient

If a published water table map is not available for the area, but several wells and springs are nearby, a contour map of the water table may be drawn. Plot on a topographic map (at an appropriate scale) a sufficient number of points of static levels of water wells, observation wells, and test pits. Include spot elevations of perennial streams, ponds, and lakes. Using an appropriate contour interval, contour the data points to produce a useful water table map. Record dates of observations to...

Dead poultry disposal

Because of the large numbers of dead birds associated with large poultry operations, the disposal of dead birds is a resource concern. Poultry facilities must have adequate means for disposal of dead birds in a sanitary manner. To prevent spread of disease, the dead birds are often collected daily by hand. Disposal alternatives include incineration, rendering, burial, dropping into a buried disposal tank, or composting. The dead birds are mixed with litter and straw, composted, and the...

G Food processing waste

Food processing facilities produce large amounts of waste, some of which are suitable for land application. Food processing waste can be either solid, slurry, or liquid. The chemical properties of the waste must be determined before a waste handling system can be designed. If the waste is biological in nature, it can be treated and handled much the same as livestock waste. Waste treatment lagoons can be used for some food processing waste. The material must be analyzed for its volatile solids...

G SCS flood plain and wetland policy

SCS environmental policy in 190-GM, part 410, applies when waste management facilities on flood plains or wetlands are being planned. This policy restricts or requires special provision for certain agricultural waste management structures or activities within flood plains and wetlands. It is SCS policy that flood plains be, to the extent practical, conserved, preserved, and restored to existing natural and beneficial value on base (100 year) flood plains as a part of technical and financial...

GFraction greater than 3 inches in diameterRock fragments stones and boulders

Rock fragments, stones, and boulders are the soil fractions greater than 3 inches and are measured as a weight percent or estimated as a volume percentage of the whole soil. The upper size limit is undefined, but for practical purposes is about 40 inches. Stoniness is a soil surface feature that is defined as the percent of stones and boulders (rock fragments greater than 10 inches in diameter) that cover the soil surface. It is represented as classes 1 through 6. Limitations for agricultural...

GHydrogeologic setting

Hydrogeology is the study of the occurrence, movement, and quality of underground water. The hydrogeologic setting of an AWMS component includes all the various geologic factors that influence the quality and quantity of underground water. Information on the hydrogeologic setting of a site is in the following sources State water quality management and assessment reports of surface and ground water use designations and impairments Geologic maps showing rock types, faults, and similar information...

Gravity drain gutters

Deep, narrow gutters can be used in swine finishing buildings (fig. 10-7). These gutters are at the lowest elevation of the pen. The animal traffic moves the waste to the gutter. The gutter fills and is periodically emptied. Gutters that have Y, U, V, or rectangular cross sectional shapes are used in farrowing and nursery swine facilities. These gutters can be gravity drained periodically. Reception pit To treatment or storage Reception pit To treatment or storage

H Agricultural chemical waste management

Many agricultural enterprises use large amounts of agricultural chemicals. The use of these chemicals seems to increase as the cost of labor increases. With this increased usage comes the potential for surface and ground water contamination as a result of improper storage of chemical residue, rinse water, and unused chemicals and the improper disposal of empty containers. Considerable research is being conducted in this area however, to date few easily managed, cost-effective alternatives have...

H Permeability

Permeability or hydraulic conductivity refers to rate at which water flows through a material. The permeability of the underlying material is an important geologic planning consideration. For example, permeability of the soil material at the excavation limits of a waste impoundment is an important factor in determining the need for a liner. Permeability can also affect the attenuation of contaminants that are land applied in utilization of wastes. Soils with lower permeability may allow the...

H Sheep

As excreted manure characteristics for sheep are limited to those for the feeder lamb (table 4-18). In some cases bedding may be a significant component of sheep waste. Table 4-17 Veal waste characterization as excreted Table 4-18 Lamb waste characterization as excreted* Component Units Veal * Increase solids and nutrients by 4 for each 1 feed waste more than 5 .

H Synthetic organic compounds

When dealing with municipal sludge, one other constraint to application rates should be addressed. Most sludge has synthetic organic compounds, such as chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides, which can be slow to decompose and may be of concern from a human or animal health standpoint. Polychlorinated biphenyls are in many sludges. Federal regulations require soil incorporation of any sludge that has more than 10 ppm of polychlorinated biphenyls wherever animal feed crops are grown. Polychlorinated...

HClient implements the plan

In step 8 the client implements the plan. Well planned, economically sound, and acceptable plans have a much greater likelihood of being implemented. Deci-sionmakers ultimately have almost total control over implementation. The planner, however, can help decisionmakers by providing approved detailed construction drawings and specifications for facilities, specific operation and maintenance plan for each component, and information on cost sharing programs, low interest loans, and other...

Permeability rate

Permeability (hydraulic conductivity) is the quality of soil that enables water to move downward through the soil profile. It generally is inferred from the permeability of the most slowly permeable horizons in the profile. Permeability is estimated from soil physical properties and is expressed in inches per hour. Permeability rates affect runoff, leaching, and decomposition rates of agricultural wastes that are applied to or incorporated in the surface layer. Application and incorporation of...

Identifying Coarse Grained Soils less than 50 fines

- Well-graded Poorly graded -Well-graded, Poorly graded -Well-graded Poorly graded -> Fines ML or MH Fines CL or CH - Fines ML or MH- Fines CL or CH - Fines ML or MH-Fines CL or CH -Fines ML or MH-Fines CL or CH _ Fines ML or MH-Fines CL or CH -Fines ML or MH-Fines CL or CH _ -> Fines ML or MH- Fines CL or CH - Note Percentages are based on estimating amounts of fines, sand, and gravel to the nearest i Source ASTM D 2488 (fig. 2). Copyright ASTM. Reprinted with permission. < 15 sand- >...

Identifying Fine Grained Soils

< 15 plus no. 200 -15-25 plus no. 200 < 15 plus no. 200 -15-25 plus no. 200 > .< 15 plus no. 200 -15-25 plus no. 200 sand > of gravel sand < of gravel sand > gravel-sand < gravel- > .< 15 plus no. 200 -15-25 plus no. 200 sand > of gravel sand < of gravel sand > gravel-sand < gravel- Lean clay with sand Lean clay with gravel Sandy lean clay Sandy lean clay with gravel Gravelly lean clay Gravelly lean clay with sand Silt with sand Silt with gravel Sandy silt < 15...

Identifying soils for engineering purposes

Particles have sharp edges and relatively plane sides with unpolished surfaces Particles are similar to angular description, but have rounded edges Subrounded Particles have nearly plane sides, but have well-rounded corners and edges Particles have smoothly curved sides and no edges Table 2 Criteria for describing particle shape (length, width, and thickness refer to the greatest, intermediate, and least dimensions of a particle, respectively) Particles with width thickness > 3 Particles meet...

IEvaluation of the results of the plan

Changing demands, growth, and technological advances create a need to evaluate an AWMS to update objectives and modify plans. Plans developed but not implemented within a few years should be re-evaluated. This requires repeating some or all of the planning elements to maintain a viable plan. The implemented AWMS may need to be fine tuned not only because of technical advances, but because of what the decisionmaker has learned about the system. This planning element gives the planner an...

Interface with other systems

The primary objective of most agricultural enterprises is the production of marketable goods. To be successful the farm manager must balance the demand on limited resources among many complicated and interdependent systems, often including, but not limited to livestock management system irrigation and drainage system resource conservation system equipment maintenance and replacement system produce storage, transport, and marketing system financial management system For an AWMS to be practical,...

Introduction

Planning an Agricultural Waste Management System (AWMS) involves the same process used for any type of natural resource management system, such as an erosion control system. Each system includes a group or series of practices planned, designed, and installed to meet a need. However, different resource concerns, management requirements, practices, environmental effects, and economic effects must be considered. The functions are accomplished by implementing components. The components may be an...

J Rabbit

Table 4-19 lists characteristics of as excreted horse manure. Because large amounts of bedding are used in the stables of most horses, qualities and quantities of wastes from these stables generally are dominated by the kind and volume of bedding used. Some properties of rabbit manure are listed in table 4-20. The properties refer only to the feces no urine has been included. Reliable information on daily production of rabbit manure, feces, or urine is not available. Table 4-19 Horse waste...

J Settlement potential

Monolithic structures are designed to behave as a structural unit. Examples include poured-in-place reinforced concrete tanks and steel tanks. These structures are particularly vulnerable to settlement. Differential settlement occurs when the settlement is not even over the entire foundation. The potential for differential settlement can be an important design consideration in certain earthfill and concrete waste impoundment structures. Segmentally designed structures are built of structurally...

J Soil pH

Soil pH affects plant nutrient availability, agricultural waste decomposition rates, and adsorption of heavy metals. Soils in which the surface pH is less than 6.5 have lower potential for plant growth and low heavy metal adsorption. Limitations and recommendations are based on the lowest pH value of the surface layer. Limitations for the application of agricultural wastes are slight if the pH in the surface layer is more than 6.5, moderate if it is 3.5 to 6.5, and severe if it is less than...

K Flush water

Hydraulic manure transport, or flush cleaning, is an effective method of manure collection and handling, but relatively large quantities of water are used. Small quantities of manure can be diluted 5 to 10 times in the cleaning process therefore, waste handling problems are multiplied. Because the resulting quantity of waste or wastewater is large, lagoons and irrigation equipment are usually parts of waste management systems using flush cleaning. While fresh water is required for cleaning in...

L Salinity

Salinity is the concentration of dissolved salts in the soil solution and is related to electric conductivity. Electrical conductivity is the standard measure of soil salinity and is recorded as Mmhos cm. High soil salinity interferes with the ability of the plant to absorb water from the soil and to exchange plant nutrients. This interference reduces plant growth and seed germination and limits the choice of crops that can be successfully grown. If soil salinity is a potential hazard or...

L Topography

Recognition of land forms and their associated problems is a valuable asset when planning a component for an AWMS. For example, flood plain sites generally have a higher water table compared to that of adjacent uplands, are subject to surface flooding, and can indicate presence of permeable soils. Topography can indicate direction of regional ground water flow. Uplands may serve as aquifer recharge areas, and valley bottoms, marshes, and lowlands as ground water discharge areas. Steep slopes...

Labor availability

Some waste handling activities, such as frequent spreading of wastes, are labor intensive. Systems considered should be carefully evaluated to determine labor requirements throughout the year. An adequate labor supply should be available for waste handling without adversely affecting the other activities of the enterprise. The planner should consider all labor requirements of the enterprise. Scheduling conflicts between such operations as waste application and crop planting and harvesting...

Laws and regulations

The planner must determine what Federal, State, and local laws apply to an AWMS. However, the decision-maker must know how the laws affect planning and operation of the AWMS and must obtain the necessary permits and licenses. The laws and regulations may require the decision-maker to obtain permits to construct and operate an AWMS. They may also dictate the type of AWMS or that certain features be incorporated into the AWMS components. Undoubtedly, the decisionmaker will need to contact...

Level of management

During the inventory phase, the level of management that will or can be provided by the decisionmaker must be assessed. An AWMS must be manageable by the decisionmaker. Some require intensive levels of management and good record keeping ability. Composting and anaerobic digesters are in this category. When a change in the waste handling system is being considered, it is necessary to evaluate any management changes that the desired system might present. For example, if a dairy farmer wants to...

M Availability and suitability of borrow material

Borrow must meet gradation, plasticity, and permeability requirements for its intended use and be in sufficient quantity to build the component. Losses routinely occur during handling, transport, placement, and consolidation of fill materials. To compensate, as much as 150 percent of the design fill requirements should be located within an economical hauling distance. Conditions of the borrow area itself may limit the usefulness of borrow materials. Limitations may include such things as...

M Slope

Slope is the inclination of the soil surface from the horizontal expressed as a percentage. The slope influences runoff velocity, erosion, and the ease with which machinery can be used. Steep slopes limit application methods and rates and machinery choices. Runoff velocity, soil carrying capacity of runoff, and potential water erosion increase as slopes become steeper. Limitations for the application of agricultural wastes are slight if the slope is less than 8 percent, moderate if it is 8 to...

Management

Contents 651.0500 Introduction 5-1 651.0502 Soil-agricultural waste interaction 5-2 651.0503 Soil-agricultural waste mineralization relationship 5-4 (a) Microbial (c) Phosphate (d) Potassium, calcium, and magnesium 5-6 (e) Heavy metal and trace element 651.0504 Soil characteristics 5-7 (a) Available water (c) Cation-exchange (d) Depth to bedrock or cemented (g) Fraction greater than 3 inches in diameter Rock fragments 5-10 (h) Intake (j) Soil (k) (l) (n) Sodium Tables Table 5-1 Common...

Management Systems

Contents 651.0800 Introduction 8-1 651.0801 Process and principles 8-1 651.0802 Design options 8-11 (a) Water (b) Odor (c) Temperature and moisture (d) Aesthetic 8-27 651.0803 References 8-30 651.0850 Appendix 8A Checklist of siting factors for AWMS components 8-A1 Figures Figure 8-1 If structures are sited below the horizon line, the landforms 8-2 provide a backdrop for the structure and serve as a model for new earth mounds Figure 8-2 Structures projecting above the horizon are prominent 8-3...

Method selection

The composting method must fit the individual farm operation. Highly sophisticated and expensive composting operations are not likely to be a viable option for small farming operations. Some factors to consider when selecting the particular method of composting include (i) Operator management capability The management capability of the operator is an important consideration when selecting the right composting method. Even simple composting methods require that the operator spend additional time...

N Presence of abandoned wells and other relics of past use

The site and its history should be surveyed for evidence of past use that may require special design considerations or AWMS component site relocation. If an abandoned well exists on the site, special efforts are required to determine if the well was sealed according to local requirements. An improperly sealed well can be a direct pathway for contaminants to pollute an aquifer. Other remnants of human activity, such as old foundations, trash pits, or filled-in areas, require special AWMS design...

N Sodium adsorption

Sodium adsorption is represented by the Sodium Adsorption Ratio (SAR), which is the measured amount of sodium relative to calcium and magnesium in a water extract from a saturated soil paste. A high and moderate SAR, more than 4, interferes with the ability of the plant to absorb water from the soil and to exchange plant nutrients. This interference reduces plant growth and seed germination and limits the choice of crops that can be successfully grown. An SAR of more than 13 has a detrimental...

Nd It

Ndis greater than 1 therefore, with one downspout the system would be downspout controlled. With three, it would be controlled by the gutter capacity, or 0.46 ft3 sec. Use three downspouts to take full advantage of gutter capacity. Step 4 Determine the roof area that can be served based on the following equation Step 2 Compute capacity of downspout. Try a H_ depth of gutter - 0.5 in _ 5.5 in _ 7.06 in 2 qd _ 0.010457 x 7.06 x 5.5 _ 0.17 ft3 sec Step 3 Determine whether the system is controlled...

Nonpoint source pollution

While concentrated animal facilities are considered point sources of pollution, other potential agricultural sources of water pollution are considered to be nonpoint sources. Each State's comprehensive water quality plan includes controls for point sources (PS) and nonpoint sources (NPS) of water pollution. Features of point and nonpoint sources of water pollution are shown in table 1-1. The prescribed approach used for control of NPS is often different from that used for PS. PS controls...

NPDES permits

Point sources of pollution can be regulated by individual or general permits. Owners or operators of most point sources are required to apply for individual permits. These include concentrated animal feeding operations, concentrated aquatic animal production facilities, and certain silvicultural activities. Part 122, Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations established conditions and procedures whereby point sources can be regulated under a general permit. General permits can be made applicable to...

Nutrient removal by harvesting of crops

The nutrient content of a plant depends on the amount of nutrients available to the plant and on the environmental growing condition. The critical level of nutrient concentration of the dry harvested material of the plant leaf is about 2 percent nitrogen, 0.25 percent phosphorus, and 1 percent potassium. Where nutrients are available in the soil in excess of plant sufficiency levels, the percentages can more than double. In forage crops, the percent composition for nitrogen can range from 1.2...

Nutrients

The principal nutrients of concern in the aquatic environment are nitrogen and phosphorus. An understanding of how these nutrients react in the environment is important to understanding the control processes discussed in later sections. (i) Nitrogen Nitrogen occurs throughout the environment in the soil, water, and surrounding air. In fact, 78 percent of the air we breathe is nitrogen. It is also a part of all living organisms. When plants and animals die or when waste products are excreted,...

Organic matter

All organic matter contains carbon in combination with one or more other elements. All substances of animal or vegetable origin contain carbon compounds and are, therefore, organic. When plants and animals die, they begin to decay. The decay process is simply the various naturally occurring micro-organisms converting the organic matter the plant and body tissue to simpler compounds. Some of these simpler compounds may be other forms of organic matter or they may be nonorganic compounds, such as...

Persistence of the substance on or in the soil

How long will it remain in place before being converted to another form or being lost through volatilization or leaching Animal waste can be deposited on pasture or rangeland, in streams where the animals congregate on hot days, or in confinement facilities where the waste must be removed and eventually returned to the land. In general, the more manure deposited by animals on pasture or feedlots or spread on the land, the greater the concentration of contaminants in runoff or percolating water....

Planning Considerations

Contents 651.0200 Introduction 2-1 651.0201 Planning for protection of natural resources 2-2 651.0202 Conservation planning process 2-4 (a) Identify the (b) Determine the (c) Inventory the (d) Analyze the resource (e) Formulate alternative (f) Evaluate alternative (g) Client determines a course of (h) Client implements the (i) Evaluation of the results of the (a) Purpose of the (b) Contents of the 651.0204 Waste impoundment planning considerations 2-11 (a) Potential risk from sudden breach of...

Plant nutrient uptake

The process of element uptake by plants is complex and not totally understood. Some generally known points are The process is not the same for all plants nor for all elements The complete process occurs within a healthy root system adequately supplied with carbohydrates and oxygen The essential elements must be in an available form in the root zone in balanced amounts Uptake varies from element to element and from crop to crop (see table 6-6) Soil conditions, such as temperature, moisture...

References

Margheim. 1974. Personal communications with C.E. Fogg. Arrington, R.M., and C.E. Pachek. 1980. Soil nutrient content of manures in an arid climate. Paper presented at Amarillo, TX. Barth, C.L. 1985. Livestock waste characterization-a new approach. In Agricultural Waste Utilization and Management. Proceedings of the Fifth International Symposium on Agricultural Wastes, ASAE, St. Joseph, MI, p. 286. Stephenson, A.H., T.A. McCaskey, and B.G. Ruffin. 1989. Treatments to...

Safety

Safety is an important aspect of planning, design, construction, and operation of an agricultural waste management system (AWMS). SCS policy as it pertains to an AWMS includes Notification of utility companies when utilities are in the vicinity of engineering investigations or construction activities (National Engineering Manual (NEM), part 503). Incorporating safety measures into structures (NEM, part 503). Informing decisionmaker and contractor of safety requirements at preconstruction...

Scrape alleys and open areas

Two kinds of manure scrapers are used to clean alleys (fig. 10-3). A mechanical scraper is dedicated to a given alley. It is propelled using electrical drives attached by cables or chains. The drive units are often Figure 10-2 Diversion of clean water around feedlot Figure 10-3 Scrape alley used in dairy barns used to power two mechanical scrapers that are traveling in opposite directions in parallel alleys in an oscillating manner. Some mechanical scrapers are in alleys under slatted floors. A...

Scrape gutters

Scrape gutters are frequently used in confined stall dairy barns. The gutters are 16 to 24 inches wide, 12 to 16 inches deep, and generally do not have any bottom slope. They are cleaned using either shuttle-stroke or chain and flight gutter cleaners (figs. 10-9 & 10-10). Electric motor driven shuttle stroke gutter cleaners have paddles that pivot on a drive rod. The drive rod travels alternately forward for a short distance and then backwards for the same distance. The paddles are designed...

Site location

A careful evaluation of the site should be made to determine the best location for components and practices of an AWMS. Aerial photographs are very helpful in site evaluation. If possible, those components that are not visually pleasing should not be located where they are routinely visible to neighbors or passersby. Some people can smell with their eyes. An AWMS that is managed correctly and has its components out of sight has few problems. Sites that are highly visible or conspicuous or that...

Soil characteristics

Soil suitabilities and limitations for agricultural waste application are based on the most severely rated soil property or properties. A severe suitability rating does not necessarily infer that agricultural wastes cannot be used. It does, however, infer a need for careful planning and design to overcome the severe limitation or hazard associated with one or more soil properties. Care must be taken in planning and designing agricultural waste management systems that are developed for soils...

Soilagricultural waste mineralization relationship

The mineralization of agricultural waste material is governed by the biological, chemical, and physical properties of soil and organic waste the soil moisture and the soil temperature. Organic waste mineralization is a process where microbes digest organic waste, reduce the waste material to inorganic constituents, and convert it to more stable organic materials. Inorganic materials released during this process are the essential plant nutrient (N, P, K), macronutrients and micronutrients,...

State laws and regulations

All State laws dealing with air and water quality and disposal of solid wastes must meet the minimum requirements of the Federal laws. Most States have such laws. Many have laws, rules, or regulations specifically addressing management of agricultural wastes in terms of surface and ground water quality requirements, management facilities, and land application. Many of the State laws, rules, and regulations are more stringent than those promulgated by the Federal Government. In the absence of...

Storage

Waste generally must be stored so that it can be used when conditions are appropriate. Storage facilities for wastes of all consistencies must be designed to meet the requirements of a given enterprise. Determining the storage period for a storage facility is crucial to the proper management of an agricultural waste management system. If too short a period is selected, the facility may fill before the waste can be used in an environmentally sound manner. Too long a period may result in an...

Summary6510309 References

Animal wastes can adversely affect water, air, and animal resources in a variety of ways. Nutrients can kill fish and create algae blooms in surface water. In ground water, nitrates can make well water unfit for human consumption, particularly for infants. In addition, organic matter can cause dissolved oxygen problems in surface water, while bacteria and other microorganisms can contaminate wells and create health problems in recreational waters. Certain constituents in animal waste can create...

The plantsoil system

The plant-soil system has advantages in using the nutrients in waste products from agricultural systems. For centuries wastes have been spread on the soil to recycle nutrients because of the positive effect on plant growth. Soils have the ability to retain plant nutrients contained in the waste. Soil retention is an important storage mechanism, and the soil is enhanced by the organic matter supplied by waste. Plants absorb the nutrients in the waste, for the most part through the roots, and...

Total systems

Agricultural waste management systems must be developed using the total systems approach. A total system accounts for all the waste associated with an agricultural enterprise throughout the year from production to utilization. In short, it is the management of all the waste, all the time, all the way. Figure 9-1 Relative handling characteristics of different kinds of manure and percent total solids

Travel routes

Existing and potential haul routes should be inventoried. Many AWMS's require that wastes be transferred to fields for land application using equipment that can haul and spread the material. Although haul routes should be the shortest distance possible, roads should be located to avoid extreme cutting, filling, and potential erosion. Where it is necessary to use public roads as haul routes, applicable State and local laws that govern their use must be followed. Use of public roads as haul...

Treatment

Liquid waste from a swine operation is commonly treated in an anaerobic lagoon, but it can also be treated in an aerobic lagoon (fig. 9-18) or oxidation ditch. Solid waste and dead pigs can be composted. Figure 9-15 Manure scraped and handled as a solid on paved lot operation Figure 9-15 Manure scraped and handled as a solid on paved lot operation

Type of enterprise

The type of enterprise is an important factor to be evaluated during the inventory. A dairy enterprise is significantly different from a beef cattle feedlot. Agricultural operations that grow their own feed present an aspect different from that of operations that buy all their livestock feed. Handling of cannery wastes is significantly different from the handling of municipal wastes. Each type of enterprise has a different overall objective that must be established by evaluating the type of...

Utilization

Glands The Neck

Swine waste is used as a feed supplement and an energy source through methane production. With proper ventilation and sufficient bedding, the solid manure can be composted in confinement facilities, and the heat generated from the composting process can be used to supplement heat in the buildings. The most common use of the nutrients in swine waste is through land application. The waste can be hauled and distributed over the land by spreading devices. If odors are a problem, liquid waste can be...

Waste consistency

Waste of different consistencies require different management techniques and handling equipment. Agricultural waste may be in the form of a liquid, slurry, semi-solid, or solid. Waste, such as manure, can change consistency throughout the system or throughout the year. The total solids (TS) concentration of manure is the main characteristic that indicates how the material can be handled. Factors that influence the TS concentration of excreted manure include the climate, type of animal, amount...

Waste Management System Code 312The

Purpose of this system practice is to use the necessary practices in a systems approach such that wastes are properly managed and the degradation of air, animal, water, plant, or soil resources is prevented. Waste Storage Structure (Code 313) A fabricated facility for the temporary storage of animal or other agricultural wastes. The purpose of the practice is to store waste until it can be safely and effectively used. Waste Treatment Lagoon (Code 359) An impoundment made by excavation or...

Waste management systems design

An agricultural waste management system design will Describe the management, operation, and maintenance of the waste from production to utilization List the practices to be installed Locate the major components on a plan map Include an installation schedule Agricultural waste management systems are highly varied, and many alternatives are available. The various processes mentioned above are usually interdependent. For example, if a landowner wants to store waste as a dry material, the waste...

Water Air and Anim al Resources

Contents 651.0300 Introduction 3-1 651.0301 Pollution versus contamination 3-1 651.0302 Effects of animal waste on the water resource 3-2 (a) Constituents affecting surface water 3-2 (b) Constituents affecting ground water 3-15 651.0303 Factors affecting the pollution process 3-17 (b) Transformations on the soil 3-17 (c) Filtering in the upper soil 3-17 (d) Transformations within the deep soil 651.0304 Controlling the pollution process 3-19 (a) Limiting (b) Preventing (c) Interrupting 651.0305...

Water quality

SCS requires that an AWMS be planned to preclude offsite discharge for precipitation events that are equal to or less than the 25-year, 24-hour storm. The sensitivity of lakes, streams, or ground water aquifers to contaminants in the agricultural waste should be evaluated and made part of the decision process of whether or not to allow discharge. Receiving water sensitivity must also be considered when establishing the intensity of management and level of efficiency needed to avoid or minimize...

Water quality criteria and standards

Water quality objectives, criteria, and standards are interrelated but different from one another. A water quality objective is a goal toward which a control program is aimed. For example, an objective of Public Law 92-500 was to eliminate discharge of all pollutants into navigable streams by 1985. Objectives often represent an ideal condition. Water quality criteria, on the other hand, represent specific, though not necessarily precise, quality characteristics that research and experience...

Worksheet 10A1Waste storage structure capacity design

Total volume of manure production for animal type for storage period, ft3 2Q 475 8. Total manure production for storage period, ft3 (TVM) ________ 27, 0 9. Daily wastewater volume per AU, ft3 AU day (DWW) 10. Total wastewater volume for animal description for storage period, ft3 0 11. Total wastewater volume for Q A D storage period, ft3 (TWW)---------------------------------9 450 12. Amount of bedding used daily for animal type, lbs AU day (WB) - 13....

Worksheet 10A2Waste storage pond design

Number of animals (N)_____________500 5. Daily volume of manure production per AU, ft3 AU day (DVM) 1.30 7. Total volume of manure production for 63 800 49 140 35 100 1 30 animal type for storage period, ft3 --------- B. Total manure production for storage period, ft3 (TVM) 9. Daily wastewater volume per AU, ft3 AU day (DWW) ll. Total wastewater volume for storage period, ft3 (TWW) 10. Total wastewater volume for animal description for storage period, ft3yr f*nn WWD DWW x...

Worksheet 10A3Anaerobic lagoon design

Daily volume of dally manure production per AU, ft3 AU day (DVM) _1. 6. Treatment period, days (D) 7. Total volume of manure production for animal type for treatment period, ft3.nnn VMD AU x DVM x D 62000 _ B. Total manure production for treatment period, ft3 (TVM)_ 10. Total wastewater volume for animal description for treatment period, ft3 WWD DWW x AU x D 11. Total wastewater volume for treatment period, ft3 (TWW) 12. Clean water added during treatment period, ft3 (CW) 13. Waste volume for...

Design considerations

Solid waste storage ponds and structures must be designed correctly to ensure desired performance and safety. Considerations include materials selection, control of runoff and seepage, necessary storage capacity, and proper design of structural components, such as sidewalls, floors, and roofs. The primary materials used in constructing timber structures for solids storage are pressure-treated or rot-resistant wood and reinforced concrete. These materials are suitable for long-term exposure to...

B Ground water

Many Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) programs deal with the development, control, and protection of ground water resources. The planners of agricultural waste management practices should be familiar with the principles of ground water. NRCS references that include information on ground water include National Engineering Handbook (NEH) Section 16, Drainage of Agricultural Lands NEH Section 18, Ground Water Engineering Field Handbook (EFH) Chapter 12, Springs and Wells and EFH...

G3G5 Effects of animal waste on the air resource

Livestock production facilities can be the source of gases, aerosols, vapors, and dust that, individually or in combination, can create such air quality problems as health problems for animals in confined housing units, corrosion of materials and the generation of deadly gases that can affect animals and humans. Different gases are produced as animal waste is degraded by micro-organisms. Under aerobic conditions, carbon dioxide is the principal gas produced. Under anaerobic conditions, the...

A Roof runoff management

Roof runoff should be diverted from feedlots and manure storage areas unless it is needed for some use, such as dilution water for waste storage ponds or treatment lagoons. This can be accomplished by roof gutters and downspouts with underground or open channel outlets (fig. 10-1). Gutters and downspouts may not be needed if the roof drainage will not come into contact with areas accessible to livestock. Figure 10-1 Roof gutter and downspout Figure 10-1 Roof gutter and downspout The area of a...

Flush alleys

Alleys can also be cleaned by flushing. Grade is critical and can vary between 1.25 and 5 percent. It may change for long flush alleys. The alley should be level perpendicular to the centerline. The amount of water used for flushing is also critical. An initial flow depth of 3 inches for underslat gutters and 4 to 6 inches for open alleys is necessary. The length and width of the flush alley are also factors. Most flush alleys should be less than 200 feet long. The width generally varies from 3...

Definitions of waste characterization terms

Table 4-1 gives definitions and descriptions of waste characterization terms. It includes abbreviations, definitions, units of measurement, methods of measurement, and other considerations for the physical and chemical properties of manure, waste, and residue. The first four physical properties weight (Wt), volume (Vol), total solids (TS), and moisture content (MC) are important to agricultural producers and facility planners and designers. They describe the amount and consistency of the...

Landscape resources

Landscape features need to be evaluated during the inventory to make the AWMS compatible with the surrounding landscape. Earth mounds, fencing, vegetation, and position on the landscape are alternatives to enhance the landscape. In addition, structures can be painted to complement other farm buildings. Similarity in construction materials and texture should be promoted. When planning AWMS components that will be visible, the planner should consider planting fast-growing trees or shrubs that...

Siting and area considerations

Compost Procedure

The location of the composting facility is a very important factor in a successful compost operation. To minimize material handling, the composting facility should be located as close as possible to the source of organic waste. If land application is the preferred method of utilization, the facility should also be located with convenient access to the land application sites. Several other important considerations when locating a compost facility are discussed below. i Wind direction Improperly...

Composting methods

Forced Aeration Pressure Compost

Three basic methods of composting windrow, static pile, and in-vessel are described below. i Windrow method The windrow method involves the arrangement of compost mix in long, narrow piles or windrows fig. 10-30 . To maintain an aerobic condition, the compost mixture must be periodically turned. This exposes the decomposing material to the air and keeps temperatures from getting too high gt 170 F . The minimum turning frequency varies from 2 to 10 days, depending on the type of mix, volume, and...