Introduction

Planning an Agricultural Waste Management System (AWMS) involves the same process used for any type of natural resource management system, such as an erosion control system. Each system includes a group or series of practices planned, designed, and installed to meet a need. However, different resource concerns, management requirements, practices, environmental effects, and economic effects must be considered.

The functions are accomplished by implementing components. The components may be an interrelated group of conservation practices, such as a waste storage pond, roof runoff water management, diversion, and waste utilization. Push-off ramps, manure pumps, transport equipment, grade control structures, and vegetative treatments are examples of component elements that support the functions.

Planning an AWMS often requires the cooperation and combined efforts of a team of people. The team is made up of the decisionmaker of the property involved and may include Soil Conservation Service (SCS) specialists and conservationists, county agricultural extension agents, and professionals outside of government. Specialists include engineers, geologists, soil scientists, and agronomists. The SCS planner must establish a good working relationship with all members of the planning team.

The planning process is often complex because of the number of alternatives to be considered; however, the AWMS selected should be as simple and easily managed as possible.

To successfully plan an AWMS, the planner should understand that it is planned under the umbrella of a Resource Management System (RMS) (fig. 2-1). An RMS is a unique combination of practices and management that when applied to a specific land use and problem situation will protect the resource base and environment. It also provides solutions to all identified resource problems and meets the decisionmaker's and public's resource use, conservation, and maintenance objectives. As such, an AWMS is a subsystem in an RMS that deals with an agricultural waste problem. In solving an agricultural waste problem, an AWMS will interface or relate to other subsystems in an RMS, such as a cropping system or a water management system.

Figure 2-1 Relationship of an Agricultural Waste

Management System, other management systems, and the Resource Management System

Figure 2-1 Relationship of an Agricultural Waste

Management System, other management systems, and the Resource Management System

The planner should view an AWMS as including the following functions: (1) production, (2) collection, (3) storage, (4) treatment, (5) transfer, and (6) utilization. This simplifies interpreting, analyzing, and evaluating the inventory data as well as the planning of alternatives.

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