L Topography

Recognition of land forms and their associated problems is a valuable asset when planning a component for an AWMS. For example, flood plain sites generally have a higher water table compared to that of adjacent uplands, are subject to surface flooding, and can indicate presence of permeable soils.

Topography can indicate direction of regional ground water flow. Uplands may serve as aquifer recharge areas, and valley bottoms, marshes, and lowlands as ground water discharge areas.

Steep slopes restrict use for some structural and vegetative measures. Hazards include instability (landslide potential) and erosion.

Karst topography is formed on limestone, gypsum, or similar rocks by dissolution and is characterized by sinkholes, caves, and underground drainage. Common problems associated with karst terrain include highly permeable foundations and the associated potential for ground water contamination, and collapsible ground. As such, its recognition is important in determining potential siting problems. Figure 7-10 is a topographic map that illustrates karst topography near Mitchell, Indiana. Note the lack of surface streams and numerous sinkholes and depressions.

Figure 7-10 Karst topography

Figure 7-10 Karst topography

Scale 1:24,000 1

Scale 1:24,000 1

Organic Gardeners Composting

Organic Gardeners Composting

Have you always wanted to grow your own vegetables but didn't know what to do? Here are the best tips on how to become a true and envied organic gardner.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment