Active power requirements

The O.P. 12.3 and the draft of the O.P. 12.2 establish no active power consumptions are allowed during the fault and the voltage recovery period. However, some momentary active power consumptions are allowed by both Operation Procedures during the fault and the clearance period, such as figs. 5 and 6 respectively show.

Fig. 5. Active power requirements according to the O.P. 12.3: (a) Balanced voltage dips; (b) unbalanced voltage dips
Fig. 6. Active power requirements according to the O.P. 12.2: (a) Balanced voltage dips; (b) unbalanced voltage dips

Active power consumptions lower than 10% of installation registered rated power are admitted during the maintenance of the fault in presence of three-phase balanced voltage dips, while this maximum allowed magnitude is increased up to 45% of registered rated power for unbalanced voltage dips, but only during 100 ms (30% each 20 ms cycle). These active power consumptions referred by the O.P. 12.3 are implicitly defined by (20). The O.P. 12.2 does not express which active power formulation must be used.

German Grid Code is not as exhaustive as the Spanish Grid Code and it specifies wind farms have the ability of active power curtailment with a ramp rate 10% of grid connection per minute.

Renewable Energy 101

Renewable Energy 101

Renewable energy is energy that is generated from sunlight, rain, tides, geothermal heat and wind. These sources are naturally and constantly replenished, which is why they are deemed as renewable. The usage of renewable energy sources is very important when considering the sustainability of the existing energy usage of the world. While there is currently an abundance of non-renewable energy sources, such as nuclear fuels, these energy sources are depleting. In addition to being a non-renewable supply, the non-renewable energy sources release emissions into the air, which has an adverse effect on the environment.

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