H

A SIX STUDENT WORKBENCH FOR THE

RURAL HIGH SCHOOL

A demand for a woodworking bench, at which a number of boys can work, caused the bench illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4 and described here to be designed and built. The bench has been made and used successfully in a number of rural high schools where space and funds will not allow the purchase and use of the familiar individual type of bench.

Bench Stop—Bill of Material

Pieces Dimensions Use

1 %"xl"x8" Left side

1 %"x4"x8" Right side

5 fíat head, bright wood screws lYs" No. 8 or 9.

Vise—Bill of Material

Pieces Dimensions Use

Material Soft wood Soft wood Soft wood

Material Oak, maple or hard pine Oak or maple Oak or maple ir'x2"xl7" ' Horizontal brace ii"x2"x2' TY2f/ Diagonal brace 1 iron bench screw %", 1' or 4 flat head, bright wood screws l1/^", No. 12, for fastening vise to jaw. 8 flat head, bright wood screws 2", No. 12, for fastening braces to jaw. 8 flat head, bright wood screws % No. 8, for fastening braces at joint.

Workbench—Bill of Material

Pieces

Dimensions

Use

Material

4

I%"xl0"xl6"xl0"

Top

Hard wood

8

I%"x5%"2' 7"

Legs

Soft wood

. 4

I%"x5%"x3'2%"

Silk

Soft wood

2

irx4"x3'2%"

End cross braces at bottom

Soft wood

2

- ir'x4"x2' 10%"

Cross braces at bottom

Soft wood

2

iä"x4"x4' 11

Middle horizontal braces at bottom Soft wood

2

ia"x4"x5' 1%"

Horizontal braces at bottom

Soft wood

2

iü"xll"xl6' 0"

Aprons

32 carriage bolts %"x7" with washers for bolting top to sills. 16 carriage bolts %"x6^" with washers for bolting sills to legs. 4V2 dozen fiat head, bright wood screws IW, No. 8 or 9, for fastening braces and aprons to legs. 16 8d finishing nails for toenailing the two middle cross braces to the legs.

32 carriage bolts %"x7" with washers for bolting top to sills. 16 carriage bolts %"x6^" with washers for bolting sills to legs. 4V2 dozen fiat head, bright wood screws IW, No. 8 or 9, for fastening braces and aprons to legs. 16 8d finishing nails for toenailing the two middle cross braces to the legs.

Fig. 3. Rural School Work Bench (Top Removed to Show Framing and Vises.)

Directions

All lumber for the bench should be thoroly dry. The top can best be made of hard pine planks which should be planed on both sides and jointed. If they are gotten out at a mill it is well to have them dressed to exactly ten inches in width and matched at the mill so that they will draw up to tight joints and make a top of exactly forty inches.

Pieces narrower than ten inches cannot be used for the top of a double bench where this kind of vise is used as the upper ends of the horizontal braces interfere with each other. It may be noted in the illustration that the points have been sawed off so as to prevent interference when opposite vises are closed at the same time.

Fig:. 5. Rural School Work Bench 'with Six Vises.

1. Cut the eight legs to exactly the same length, 2' 7" and lay out the mortises 1%" x 5%" on one edge at one end of each piece and cut the mortises with the cross-cut saw and rip saw. (Do not split out the wood for the mortises.)

2. Cut the four sills to exactly the same length, 3' 2%", and fasten to the legs with two %" x 6y2" carriage bolts at each joint. It is well to measure the exact width of the four planks and the thickness of the two aprons and regulate the length of the sills accordingly. Any deviation from the widths called for in the drawing must be corrected here.

3. Measure and cut the two lower end cross braces to the same length as the sills, 3' and fasten with two No. 8 or 9 flat head wood screws at each end of each piece.

4. Measure and cut the horizontal braces to the lengths called for in the above bill of material and fasten to the legs with three V/o" No. 8 or 9 flat head wood screws at each end of each piece. The two middle lower cross braces should be cut to their length, 4' HtV", and placed in position at the same time as the lower horizontal braces as they butt against the legs between the horizontal braces. They should be fastened by toenailing with two 8d finishing nails from each side.

5. Fasten the aprons in the positions with three l1^" No. 8 or 9 flat head wood screws.. Avoid placing a screw in the center where it will interfere with the bench screw.

6. Lay out the mortises in the apron for the horizontal braces of the vise so that the top of the mortises are 7" from the top of the bench or from the top of the apron and so that the inside of the mortises falls flush with the sides of the legs. The mortises should be made slightly larger than the braces so that the braces will work thru them freely.

7. Locate and bore a hole for the bench screws with a bit 1/16" larger than the bench screw thru the aprons and legs on a center line of the leg, 7y2" from the top of the bench, or 5%" from the top of the apron.

Fig. 6. Inside View of Vise.

8. Place the bench screw thru the hole and fasten the screw washer in place on the inside of the leg with two 1%" No. 12 flat h*ad wood screws.

9. The braces for the vise are assembled at the half-lap joint and placed thru the apron from the inside and fastened to the jaw of the vise with two 2" No. 12 flat head wood screws at each brace.

10. Lay the top planks in place, clamp tightly, and draw lines across over the center of the cross sills.

11. Locate points on lines just drawn, H/2" from each edge of each plank, excepting the outside edge of the outside planks which are 3*4".

12. Bore holes deep on points just located with 7/$" bit.

13. Continue holes thru planks and into sills with %" bit.

14. Remove planks and continue holes thru sills.

15. Place planks in position and fasten with bolts, usin^ one washer for each bolt.

16. Plug the holes in the top of the bench.

>cniini7irc[>

Tongue and Groove

7. g or length to suit

Door ELnd

7. g or length to suit

Door ELnd

Tool Cabinet for 5chool Wood^Shop

Lenqth of rack determined bq number* of sows ^

¿Chisels and larqe screwdrivers

Chisels

Top member of saw rack

Try Square Bracket

Rock for Two-Foot, Four-Fold Rule

Rack for Bits

Lenqth determined by number of bits.

Distance between member^, is determined by the lenqth of saws yV^

% Chamfer

Chamfer iv. ^x/fr \5aw kerf across stock

Base member of saw rock if holes squared of top for bits

To be hung on screw hooks

T bevels Braces

Mallets, with screw eye in end

Dividers

Copinq saws

Drowmq Knife

«Steel square_

lo be hunq on nails

Hammers Wrench .Saw set

Paint a silhouette of each too! on the wall

Planes rnaq be placed on a shelf with the nose restinq on a / wooden strip

WOODWORKING TOOL RACKS

tO Ci

It is recommended that the tool racks which are dimensioned on p. 26 be made of oak, maple or other hardwood. These racks are in use in the author's shop and not only hold the tools but hold them in such a way that they may be removed quickly and without loss of motion. It may be noted that the saw rack, Fig. 7, holds the saws in such a way that the workman may take a saw from the rack and use it without change of position of the hand.

As indicated by the silhouette of the draw shave on p. 26, it is very desirable to paint a silhouette of all tools where they are to hang. It encourages having a place for each tool and keeping it in that place when not in use.

Fig. 7. Detail of Rack for Woodworking

Tools.

CD .s? 2 " 5 ? * * 2 ~ to £ O CL u c\iaj — cu^cocuoj^aj^^-^u

CD .s? 2 " 5 ? * * 2 ~ to £ O CL u c\iaj — cu^cocuoj^aj^^-^u

Q £

LUMBER RACK

In school shops and on the farms it is highly desirable that a place be provided for the storage of lumber and that this place be such as may be gotten at easily and so arranged that any piece of lumber may be taken from the stock on hand without moving large quantities.

The particular arrangement of a shop makes a situation peculiar.to that shop, due to space, light, windows, stairs, doors, benches, etc. and each farm presents a problem of its own. One farm may have space for lumber in the attic of the farm shop, while on another it may be required to store it in the implement shed, granary or elsewhere.

The drawing is one of a simple, yet serviceable, rack which may be placed in any of the above places. It is seldom that a large quantity of one kind of lumber need be kept on hand, but a variety is desirable. This rack, as may be noted, is provided with ten shelves to make this provision.

In some instances on farms, the 4" x 4" posts may be extended up and fastened to a joist, rafter or collar beam above and thus dispense with the long horizontal members.

It is difficult and often impossible to make a desirable finished article in farm wood work either in the school shop or home farm shop out of warped, weatherbeaten, knotty lumber or dry goods boxes. If it is desired in the school shop or home farm shops to make farm devices or appliances which will promote the mechanical end of farming it seems advisable to first obtain a quantity of such lumber, as a first-class carpenter would need to construct the desired articles and store it in a dry place on a lumber rack.

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